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Basque researchers turn light upside down


Researchers from CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian, Spain), in collaboration with the Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC, San Sebastian, Spain) and Kansas State University (USA), report in Science the development of a so called 'hyperbolic metasurface' on which light propagates with completely reshaped wafefronts. This scientific achievement towards a more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for the long run technological challenge of miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing.

Graphene does double duty for plasmons


A study by ICFO, CIC nanoGUNE, Columbia University and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan published in Nature Materials demonstrates how graphene can be employed simultaneously as both a plasmonic medium and detector.

Pablo Alonso-González, Winner of the RSEF-BBVA Foundation 2014 prize


The nanoGUNE researcher Pablo Alonso-González has been awarded the RSEF-BBVA Foundation 2014 prize for Physics in the New Researchers in Experimental Physics category. Alonso-González works in this center’s Nanooptics group in Donostia-San Sebastian and his research is currently focussing on the optical properties of graphene at the nanoscale. The researcher was the first to obtain guided light imaging in this material with nanometric precision, and his work was published by the journal Nature.

Nature Materials: Graphene plasmons go ballistic


Squeezing light into tiny circuits and controlling its flow electrically is a holy grail that has become a realistic scenario thanks to the discovery of graphene. This tantalizing goal is realized by exploiting so-called plasmons, in which electrons and light move together as one coherent wave. Plasmons guided by graphene -a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms – are remarkable as they can be confined to length scales of nanometers, one to two hundred times below the wavelength of light. However, until now these plasmons were found to rapidly lose energy, limiting the range over which they could travel.

Science: Flatland optics with graphene


Researchers from nanoGUNE, in collaboration with ICFO and Graphenea, introduce a platform technology based on optical antennas for trapping and controlling light with the one-atom-thick material graphene. The experiments show that the dramatically squeezed graphene-guided light can be focused and bent, following the fundamental principles of conventional optics. The work, published yesterday in Science, opens new opportunities for smaller and faster photonic devices and circuits.

Journal of Optics: Special issue on graphene nanophotonics


nanoGUNE’s researcher Alexey Nikitin, in collaboration with researchers from the Imperial College (London) and the University of Zaragoza (Spain), has participated as a “guest editor” in the Special Issue on Graphene Nanophotonics published by Journal of Optics. The Special Issue focuses on the emerging Graphene nanophotonics research area, where topics on nanophotonics and the several extraordinary properties of graphene are combined.

The Ludwig-Genzel-Prize 2014 is awarded to Rainer Hillenbrand


The Ludwig-Genzel-Prize 2014 has been awarded to the Ikerbasque Research Professor at nanoGUNE and the UPV/EHU Rainer Hillenbrand for “the design and development of infrared near-field spectroscopy and the application of this novel spectroscopic method in different areas of natural sciences”.

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